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CCQM Activities in the Organic Analysis Working Group

Summary

NIST's Chemical Sciences Division has participated in over 50 Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance - Metrology in Chemistry (CCQM) Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) studies since 1997 and coordinated numerous studies over this long history. The CCQM conducts international comparisons to establish equivalence among measurements made by national metrology institutes (NMIs). Recent OAWG studies included a direct comparison of CRMs for vitamin B3 (niacin) in milk powders and infant/adult nutritional formulas, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in olive oil, purity assessments of folic acid and bisphenol A.

Description

The results from these studies will be used to demonstrate the capabilities of participating NMIs for their similar measurement services, and eventually benchmark the appropriate Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) that summarizes this capability.  NIST CMCs that directly support SI traceability (e.g., pure chemical standards, calibration solutions) are also benchmarked by this process.

Major Accomplishments

  • CCQM-K55c Purity assignment of L-valine
  • CCQM-K55d Purity assignment of folic acid
  • CCQM-K131 Low-polarity analytes in a multicomponent organic solution: PAHs in acetonitrile
  • CCQM-K142 Comparison of CRMs and value-assigned quality controls: urea and uric acid in human serum or plasma
  • CCQM-K146 PAHs in olive oil
  • CCQM-K147 Comparison of value-assigned CRMs for niacin (vitamin B3) in milk powder and infant formula matrices

ASSOCIATED PUBLICATIONS

Created January 24, 2009, Updated May 13, 2019