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Search Publications by Brian Hoskins

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Room-temperature skyrmions in strain-engineered FeGe thin films

Author(s)
Sujan Budhathoki, Arjun Sapkota, Ka M. Law, Smriti Ranjit, Bhuwan Nepal, Brian D. Hoskins, Arashdeep S. Thind, Albina Y. Borisevich, Michelle E. Jamer, Travis J. Anderson, Andrew D. Koehler, Karl D. Hobart, Gregory M. Stephen, Don Heiman, Tim Mewes, Rohan Mishra, James C. Gallagher, Adam J. Hauser
Skyrmion electronics hold great promise for low energy consumption and stable high information density, and stabilization of Skyrmion lattice (SkX) phase at or

Streaming Batch Eigenupdates for Hardware Neural Networks

Author(s)
Brian D. Hoskins, Matthew W. Daniels, Siyuan Huang, Advait Madhavan, Gina C. Adam, Nikolai B. Zhitenev, Jabez J. McClelland, Mark D. Stiles
Neuromorphic networks based on nanodevices, such as metal oxide memristors, phase change memories, and flash memory cells, have generated considerable interest

Spontaneous current constriction in threshold switching devices

Author(s)
Jonathan M. Goodwill, Georg Ramer, Dasheng Li, Brian D. Hoskins, Georges Pavlidis, Jabez J. McClelland, Andrea Centrone, James A. Bain, Marek Skowronski
Threshold switching devices exhibit extremely non-linear current-voltage characteristics, which are of increasing importance for a number of applications

Research Update: Electron beam-based metrology after CMOS

Author(s)
James A. Liddle, Brian D. Hoskins, Andras Vladar, John S. Villarrubia
The strengths of and challenges facing electron-based metrology for post-CMOS technology are reviewed. Directed self-assembly, nanophotonics/plasmonics, and