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Publications

Search Publications by

Michael Lewis (Assoc)

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Displaying 1 - 22 of 22

Development of a 4K Regenerator and Pulse Tube Test Facility

October 10, 2012
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley, Ryan P. Taylor, Ray Radebaugh
Recent advances in superconducting electronic systems are requiring larger envelopes for cooling power, efficiency, and operational environments from commercial based cryogenic cooling systems. One such system targeted at meeting these requirements is the

Verification of the Back-EMF Method for Piston Velocity Measurements

July 10, 2012
Author(s)
Ray Radebaugh, Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley
Linear compressors are used to drive pulse tube or Stirling cryocoolers, and they can be used as expanders in place of inertance tubes when inertance tubes cannot provide sufficient phase shifts between flow and pressure. Commercial linear compressors

Experiments with Linear Compressors for Phase Shifting in Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

June 13, 2011
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley, Ray Radebaugh
For the past year NIST has been investigating the use of mechanical phase shifters as warm expanders for pulse tube cryocoolers. Unlike inertance tubes, which have a limited phase shifting ability at low acoustic powers, mechanical phase shifters have the

Model for Transient Behavior of Pulse Tube Cryocooler

January 1, 2011
Author(s)
Gershon Grossman, Peter E. Bradley, Michael A. Lewis, Ray Radebaugh
This article describes an investigation of the transient behavior of a small (2.0 W at 85 K) Pulse Tube cryocooler operating at 120 Hz with an average pressure of 3.5 MPa, capable of relatively fast cool-down to about 60 K. In a series of experiments, the

Effect of Component Geometry on Flow Nonuniformities in a Large Pulse Tube Cryocooler

May 17, 2010
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ryan P. Taylor, Ray Radebaugh, Peter E. Bradley
A single-stage pulse tube cryocooler was designed to achieve 50 W of refrigeration power at 50 K when driven by a pressure oscillator that can produce up to 2.8 kW of acoustic power at 60 Hz. Initial experimental data produced no-load temperatures that

Investigation of Flow Nonuniformities in a Large 50 K Pulse Tube Cryocooler

June 28, 2009
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ryan P. Taylor, Ray Radebaugh, Isaac Garaway, Peter E. Bradley
A single stage pulse tube cryocooler was optimized to provide 50 W of net refrigeration power at 50 K when driven by a pressure oscillator that can produce up to 2.8 kW of acoustic power at 60 Hz. The cryocooler was designed with the ability to provide

Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Rapid Cooldown of A Superconducting Magnet

June 9, 2008
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ryan P. Taylor, Peter E. Bradley, Isaac Garaway, Ray Radebaugh
A single-stage pulse tube cryocooler was designed to provide rapid cooldown of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet that is part of a gyrotron required for the generation of a high-power mm-wave (95 GHz) beams. These beams are used in the

Impedance Measurements of Inertance Tubes at High Frequency and Pressure

July 16, 2007
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ryan P. Taylor, Peter E. Bradley, Ray Radebaugh, Gershon Grossman, Zhihua Gan
Previous comparisons between measured and calculated inertance tube impedance were made at frequencies below 70 Hz and average pressures below 3 MPa. In this paper, we present results on similar comparisons for frequencies up to 150 Hz and average

MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS ON FAST COOLDOWN OF A 120 Hz PULSE TUBE CRYOCOOLER

July 16, 2007
Author(s)
Srinivas Vanapalli, Michael A. Lewis, Gershon Grossman, Zhihua Gan, Ray Radebaugh, H.J. M. ter Brake
High frequency operation of a pulse tube cryocooler leads to reduced regenerator volume, which results in a reduced heat capacity and a faster cooldown time. A pulse tube cryocooler operating at a frequency of 120 Hz and an average pressure of 3.5 MPa

120Hz Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Fast Cooldown to 50K

February 13, 2007
Author(s)
Srinivas Vanapalli, Michael A. Lewis, Zhihua Gan, Ray Radebaugh
A pulse tube cryocooler operating at 120 Hz with 3.5 MPa average pressure achieved a no-load temperature of about 49.9 K and a cooldown time to 80 K of 5.5 minutes. The net refrigeration power at 80 K was 3.35 W with an efficiency of about 22.6% of Carnot

Characterization of Inertance Tubes Using Resonance Effects

June 14, 2006
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley, Ray Radebaugh, Zhihua Gan
Inertance tubes can be characterized by their inertance, compliance, and resistance. All three of these impedance components are present during normal measurements of inertance tube impedance. As a result, in comparing experimental results with models it

Proposed Rapid Cooldown Technique for Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

June 14, 2006
Author(s)
Ray Radebaugh, Agnes O?Gallagher, Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley
Some cryocooler applications, such as those for military operations dealing with high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets, motors, or generators, require faster cooldown times than what can normally be provided with a cryocooler designed to

Inertance Tube Optimization for Pulse Tube Refrigerators

April 27, 2006
Author(s)
Ray Radebaugh, Michael A. Lewis, Ercang Lou, John M. Pfotenhauer, G. F. Nellis, L. F. Schunk
The efficiency of regenerative refrigerators is generally maximized when the pressure and flow are in phase near the midpoint of the regenerator. Such a phase relationship minimizes the amplitude of the mass flow for a given acoustic power flow through the

Evaluation of Pressure Oscillator Losses

August 29, 2005
Author(s)
Peter E. Bradley, Michael A. Lewis, Ray Radebaugh
Efficiencies of regenerative cryocoolers are influenced by losses within the pressure oscillator (compressor). An evaluation of these losses is important when searching for ways to improve the overall cryocooler efficiency. Typically, compressor efficiency

Impedance Measurements of Inertance Tubes

August 29, 2005
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley, Ray Radebaugh
The flow impedance of an inertance tube 5.74 mm inside diameter and 2.36 m long coupled to various reservoir volumes was measured and compared with that predicted by a model based on a transmission line analogy. Though data at other average pressures and

Measurements of phase shifts in an inertance tube

January 1, 2005
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Peter E. Bradley, Ray Radebaugh, Ercang Lou
Phase shifts and mass flows were measured at the inlet of an inertance tube. and the results are compared with transmission line models. The mass flow rates at the entrance to the inertance tube are obtained using a hot-wire anemometer. The hot wire was

Measurement of Heat Conduction Through Bonded Regenerator Matrix Materials

December 1, 2003
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ray Radebaugh
Regenerative heat exchangers have had a significant influence on the development of small refrigerators for cryogenic applications. The optimized design of these regenerators takes into account the axial thermal conduction of the matrix. Until recently

Measurement of Heat Conduction through Metal Spheres

January 1, 2002
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, Ray Radebaugh
This paper describes the results of the measurements of heat conduction through a bed of packed metal spheres. Spheres were packed in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the packed bed was cooled by a

Effect of Regenerator Geometry on Pulse Tube Refrigerator Performance

June 1, 1998
Author(s)
Michael A. Lewis, T Kuriyama, J Xiao, Ray Radebaugh
This paper gives results of the cooling performance of a double-inlet pulse tube refrigerator using various redenerators. The same pulse tube was used for all the experiments and measured 4.76 mm in diameter and 46.2 m in length. A commercial linear

Measurement of Heat Conduction Through Stacked Screens

July 1, 1997
Author(s)
T Kuriyama, F Kuriyama, Michael A. Lewis, Ray Radebaugh
This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter