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Search Publications by George P. Eppeldauer

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Displaying 1 - 25 of 146

Broadband Radiometric LED Measurements

Author(s)
George P. Eppeldauer, Catherine C. Cooksey, Howard W. Yoon, Leonard M. Hanssen, Vyacheslav B. Podobedov, Robert E. Vest, Uwe Arp, Carl C. Miller
At present, broadband radiometric measurements of LEDs with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either spectral radiometric

Standardization of UV LED measurements

Author(s)
George P. Eppeldauer, Thomas C. Larason, Howard W. Yoon
Traditionally used source spectral-distribution or detector spectral-response based standards cannot be applied for accurate UV LED measurements. Since the CIE

New night vision goggle gain definition

Author(s)
Vyacheslav B. Podobedov, George P. Eppeldauer, Thomas C. Larason
A new definition is proposed for the calibration of Night Vision Goggle (NVG) gains. This definition is based on the measurement of radiometric input and output

Standardization of Broadband UV Measurements

Author(s)
George P. Eppeldauer
The CIE standardized rectangular-shape UV response functions can be realized only with large spectral mismatch errors. The spectral power-distribution of UV

PV-MCT working standard radiometer

Author(s)
George P. Eppeldauer, Vyacheslav B. Podobedov
Sensitive infrared working-standard detectors with large active area are needed to extend the signal dynamic range of the National Institute of Standards and

Infrared detector calibrations

Author(s)
George P. Eppeldauer, Vyacheslav B. Podobedov
An InSb working standard radiometer, first calibrated at NIST in 1999 against a cryogenic bolometer, was recently calibrated against a newly developed low-NEP