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Structure and Property Characterization of Porous Low-k Dialectric Constant Thin Films Using X-ray Reflectivity and Small Angle Neutron Scattering

Published

Author(s)

Eric K. Lin, Wen-Li Wu, C Jin, J T. Wetzel

Abstract

A novel methodology using a combination of high energy ion scattering x-ray reflectivity, and small angle neutron scattering is used to characterize the structure and properties of porous low-k dielectric films after varying process conditions. From these techniques we determine the film thickness, average electron density, and density depth profile, wall density, porosity, average pore size, and pore connectivity. When the dielectric constant increases from 1.5 to 2.2, the relative wall density increases by approximately 25% and relative decreases in the volume fraction of porosity and the average pore size are approximately 10% and 50% respectively.
Proceedings Title
Materials, Technology and Reliability for Advance Interconnects and Low-k Dielectrics | | | Materials Research Society
Volume
612
Conference Dates
April 24-28, 2001
Conference Title
Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings

Keywords

density profile, hydrogen silsesquioxane, pore size, porosity, porous low-k dielectric, small angle neutron scattering, specular x-ray reflectivity, wall density

Citation

Lin, E. , Wu, W. , Jin, C. and Wetzel, J. (2001), Structure and Property Characterization of Porous Low-k Dialectric Constant Thin Films Using X-ray Reflectivity and Small Angle Neutron Scattering, Materials, Technology and Reliability for Advance Interconnects and Low-k Dielectrics | | | Materials Research Society (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created April 1, 2001, Updated February 17, 2017