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Physical Mechanisms of Ultra-thin Silicon Dioxide Degradation and Breakdown

Published

Author(s)

Eric M. Vogel

Abstract

The physical mechanisms responsible for the degradation and breakdown of silicon dioxide have been studied for over three decades. Although a large body of research on the physical mechanisms of breakdown exists, controversies remain. This paper will review our work on the use of constant voltage stress (CVS), substrate hot-electron (SHE), substrate hot-hole (SHH) injection, temperature dependence and pulse stressing to provide insight into defect generation and breakdown of ultra-thin oxide. SHE (SHH) injection allows for an investigation of the effects of electron (hole) fluence on degradation and breakdown independent of other parameters such as oxide field. Using a wide variety of stress conditions, we have been able develop an improved understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the degradation and breakdown of silicon dioxide.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Silicon Nitride, Silicon Dioxide Thin Insulating Films and Other Emerging Dielectrics
Volume
2005
Issue
1
Conference Title
8th International Symposium on Silicon Nitride, Silicon Dioxide Thin Insulating Films and Other Emerging Dielectrics

Citation

Vogel, E. (2005), Physical Mechanisms of Ultra-thin Silicon Dioxide Degradation and Breakdown, Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Silicon Nitride, Silicon Dioxide Thin Insulating Films and Other Emerging Dielectrics (Accessed July 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created January 30, 2005, Updated January 27, 2020