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Characterization of Electrothermal Actuation with Nanometer and Microradian Precision

Published

Author(s)

Craig R. Copeland, Craig D. McGray, Jon C. Geist, Vladimir A. Aksyuk, Samuel M. Stavis

Abstract

A recently introduced particle-tracking method was used to measure the single motion cycles of an electrothermal actuator with nanometer and microradian precision. Driving the actuator with a low-noise input induced deterministic motion that was perfectly repeatable within measurement uncertainty, even with an imperfect mechanical linkage in the system. Driving the actuator with a high-noise input induced motion fluctuations from which the play in the linkage was estimated, and which indicated its stochastic coupling and decoupling, resulting in a nondeterministic output of the system. This study establishes a novel methodology for characterizing MEMS motion.
Proceedings Title
18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems
Conference Dates
June 21-25, 2015
Conference Location
Anchorage, AK
Conference Title
Transducers 2015

Keywords

Electrothermal, MEMS, microelectromechanical, microscopy, nanoparticle, superresolution, tracking

Citation

Copeland, C. , McGray, C. , Geist, J. , Aksyuk, V. and Stavis, S. (2015), Characterization of Electrothermal Actuation with Nanometer and Microradian Precision, 18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, Anchorage, AK, [online], https://doi.org/10.1109/TRANSDUCERS.2015.7181042 (Accessed July 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created June 21, 2015, Updated November 10, 2018