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Jacob Taylor

Advances in our understanding quantum mechanics enables new technological and physical investigations that examine the fundamental connection between emergent behavior of quantum systems and computational complexity. Currently it seems that there is a discrepancy between what nature makes easy and hard: classical physics and quantum mechanics disagree on this point. Thus measurement is easy in classical systems and difficult in quantum systems, while certain computational problems, such as simulating quantum systems and factoring large numbers, appear to be easier for quantum systems than classical systems. Taylor works towards a deeper understand of this classical-quantum divide, hoping to determine a constructive approach towards larger and larger quantum systems. The focus is on three main research areas: implementations of quantum systems using nano fabrication-based approaches, applications of quantum information science to technological challenges, and answering fundamental questions about complexity and computability.

Taylor is a Physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, co-director of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (http://quics.umd.edu) at the University of Maryland, and a Joint Quantum Institute (http://jqi.umd.edu) Fellow. His research group investigates the fundamental limits to quantum devices for computation and communication. He received an AB in Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics at Harvard in 2000 and then spent a year as a Luce Scholar at the University of Tokyo. Taylor returned to Harvard for his PhD in the group of Mikhail Lukin in 2006, working on approaches to quantum computing and fault tolerance using spins in quantum dots. He went on to a Pappalardo Fellowship at MIT, working with members of both the Condensed Matter Theory group and the Center for Theoretical Physics, and during that time co-invented diamond-based magnetometry. In 2009 Taylor joined the Joint Quantum Institute and NIST. He is the recipient of the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the AAAS, the Samuel J. Heyman Service to American "Call to Service" medal, the Silver Medal of the Commerce Department, the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering, and the IUPAP C15 Young Scientist prize.

For more details, please see: http://groups.jqi.umd.edu/taylor

Publications

Photon thermalization via laser cooling of atoms

Author(s)
Chiao-Hsuan Wang, Michael Gullans, James V. Porto, William D. Phillips, Jacob M. Taylor
The cooling of atomic motion by scattered light enables a wide variety of technological and scientific explorations. Here we focus on laser cooling from the

Efimov States of Strongly Interacting Photons

Author(s)
Jacob M. Taylor, Alexey V. Gorshkov, Michael Gullans, D Ruzik, Seth Rittenhouse, J.P. D'Incao, Paul Julienne, S Diehl
We introduce a new system to study Efimov physics based on interacting photons in cold gases of Rydberg atoms. This system has a large anisotropy between the
Created July 17, 2018