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Craig Copeland

Craig Copeland is a Research Scientist in the Microsystems & Nanotechnology Division. He received a B.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Physics from The Johns Hopkins University. At Johns Hopkins, he developed devices and methods for applying and measuring forces in single-cell systems. His current research focuses on the design and characterization of reference materials and calibration methods for localization microscopy, and developing measurement methods for microelectromechanical systems, nanofabrication processes, nanoparticle characterization, and cancer diagnostics.

Selected Publications

  • Heterotypic cell pair co-culturing on patterned microarrays, E. J. Felton, C. R. Copeland, C. S. Chen, and D. H. Reich, Lab on a Chip 12, 3117–3126 (2012).
  • Mechanical Coupling Between Myofibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes Slows Electric Conduction in Fibrotic Cell Monolayers, S. A. Thompson, C. R. Copeland, D. H. Reich, and L. Tung, Circulation 123, 2083–U71 (2011).

Publications

Subnanometer localization accuracy in widefield optical microscopy

Author(s)
Craig R. Copeland, Jon C. Geist, Craig D. McGray, Vladimir A. Aksyuk, James A. Liddle, Bojan R. Ilic, Samuel M. Stavis
The common assumption that precision is the limit of accuracy in localization microscopy and the typical absence of comprehensive calibration of optical

Aperture Arrays for Subnanometer Calibration of Optical Microscopes

Author(s)
Craig R. Copeland, Craig D. McGray, Jon C. Geist, James A. Liddle, Bojan R. Ilic, Samuel M. Stavis
We fabricate and test subresolution aperture arrays as calibration devices for optical localization microscopy. An array pitch with a relative uncertainty of
Created February 26, 2019, Updated June 15, 2020