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Quantum information science

Quantum information science research at NIST explores ways to employ phenomena exclusive to the quantum world to measure, encode and process information for useful purposes, from powerful data encryption to computers that could solve problems intractable with classical computers.

By its very nature, quantum science sets fundamental limits on precision measurements, so by necessity NIST is a leader in basic and applied research in quantum science. Some of the most fundamental quantum research in the world is carried out in partnerships between NIST and top universities, such as JILA, the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS). Scientists in these institutes leverage the combined resources of the partners to advance research in the control of atoms and molecules and development of ultra-fast lasers capable of manipulating states of matter. The discoveries that have been made in these institutes continue to be applied at NIST to meeting new measurement challenges, such as the development of the world’s best atomic clocks and lasers.

An emerging research focus at NIST is understanding the potential for quantum-based technology to transform security, computing and communications, and to develop the measurement and standards infrastructure necessary to exploit this potential. Breakthroughs at NIST enabled the first forays into real-world quantum computing and tested the limits of quantum information and security. NIST is also developing the technology to harness the power of quantum computing in the everyday world through nanotechnology.

What is Quantum Physics? Dancers Explain.

Quantum Dance Dancers
Credit: ©Jim Carmody

Quantum physics drives much of the research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Explaining this research is a challenge, because quantum physics—nature's rules for the smallest particles of matter and light—inspires words like weird, curious, and counter-intuitive. The quantum world is strange and invisible in the context of everyday life. And yet, quantum physics can be explained and at least partially demonstrated visually.

NIST physicist Ray Simmonds recently collaborated with MFA graduate candidate Sam Mitchell of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), to create a dance piece based on the laws of quantum physics. The piece, Dunamis Novem (Latin for "the chance happening of nine things"),* premiered at The La Jolla Playhouse Forum Theatre in January, as a part of Mitchell's thesis work. Read more about this project.

News and Updates

Projects and Programs

Qubits

The Qubits Project develops new geometries for superconducting quantum binary devices as fundamental building blocks for quantum computing.

Publications

Optimal Bayesian Experimental Design

Author(s)
Robert D. McMichael
This manual describes an implementation of optimal Bayesian experimental design methods. These methods address routine measurements where data are fit to

Software

Awards

Alan Migdall Elected OSA Fellow

Optical Society of America (OSA) members who have served with distinction in the advancement of optics may be proposed for election to the...