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Thermal Performance of Fire Fighters Protective Clothing. 2 Protective Clothing Performance Simulator - User's Manual

Published

Author(s)

Kuldeep R. Prasad, H H. Minh, S R. Kukuck

Abstract

PCPS is an abbreviation for the Protective Clothing Performance Simulator, a software tool provided to help predict the thermal response of multi-layered fabrics to conditions that might be experienced during a fire. A proper analysis, and therefore meaningful results, requires calculation of not only the heat, but also the mass (moisture) transfer through the fabric layers.This manual is intended to provide the basic information necessary to perform a simulation and interpret the results, but is not intended to develop the rigorous underlying theory behind the simulation. Readers who are interested in these details are referred to the technical manual of PCPS, included in the documentation.This manual has been written with the assumption that the user possesses a base knowledge of the Windows operating system. Specifically, the user should know how to navigate using the Explorer application and be knowledgeable of the basic format of an application window (minimize, maximize and close).
Citation
NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR) - 6901
Report Number
6901

Keywords

Heat Transfer, Protective Clothing, Users Manual

Citation

Prasad, K. , Minh, H. and Kukuck, S. (2003), Thermal Performance of Fire Fighters Protective Clothing. 2 Protective Clothing Performance Simulator - User's Manual, NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR), National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, [online], https://doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.6901 (Accessed May 17, 2022)
Created January 1, 2003, Updated November 10, 2018