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Standards: Who Needs Them? An OLES initiative to identify standards needs in the responder community.

Published

Author(s)

William G. Billotte, Jennifer L. Marshall, Sharon Nakich

Abstract

There is little understanding about who is interested in standards and which standards are being used in the responder community. Thus, the Law Enforcement Standards Office (OLES) implemented a small pilot to gather metrics and insights. OLES worked with ASTM International, IEEE, and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to provide access to all of their standards and to pay for any downloaded standards from ASTM International and IEEE. The pilot was lanched on August 2, 2011 and the standards were available through October 31, 2011 to anyone with a government (.gov) or military (.mil) email address. The pilot attracted 297 registered users, 114 of them within the Department of Defense (DoD), 34 within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 28 from local governments, and 23 from state governments. There were a total of 612 downloaded standards. The most popular standards on the pilot were related to radiation detection. The pilot garnered numerous positive comments and a follow-on to address some lesson's learned is being planned.
Citation
OTHER -

Keywords

law enforcement, pilot, responder, standards

Citation

Billotte, W. , Marshall, J. and Nakich, S. (2012), Standards: Who Needs Them? An OLES initiative to identify standards needs in the responder community., Other, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=910380 (Accessed February 24, 2024)
Created January 3, 2012, Updated February 19, 2017