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Standard Product Models for Supporting Automated Erection of Structural Steelwork

Published

Author(s)

Robert R. Lipman, Vineet Kamat

Abstract

A piece of automation equipment such as a robotic crane for steel erection has no intrinsic knowledge of the process it automates. Thus, geometric and spatial information about a component such as a steel member, and the motion sequences that must be executed to move that component from a staging area to its installed final location, must both be programmed into the equipment. In automated steel construction, the position and orientation of steel members in a temporary staging area is project and site dependent, and thus cannot be automatically determined beforehand. The final in-place spatial configuration (position and orientation) of a steel member, however, can be conceptually extracted automatically from a product model of the structure being erected. The presented research evaluates this hypothesis and investigates the extent to which the CIMsteel Integration Standards (CIS/2) can specify product descriptions capable of supporting automated erection of structural steelwork.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction
Conference Dates
October 3-5, 2006
Conference Location
Tokyo

Keywords

structural steelwork, automation, emulation, steel members, structures, construction

Citation

Lipman, R. and Kamat, V. (2006), Standard Product Models for Supporting Automated Erection of Structural Steelwork, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Automation and Robotics in Construction, Tokyo, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=905551 (Accessed March 3, 2024)
Created October 3, 2006, Updated February 19, 2017