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A quantitative model for the bipolar amplification effect: A new method to determine semiconductor/oxide interface state densities

Published

Author(s)

James Ashton, Stephen Moxim, Ashton Purcell, Patrick Lenahan, Jason Ryan

Abstract

We report on a model for the bipolar amplification effect (BAE), which enables defect density measurements utilizing BAE in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). BAE is an electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) technique, which has recently been utilized for defect identification because of the improved EDMR sensitivity and selectivity to interface defects. In previous work, BAE was utilized exclusively in EDMR measurements. Although BAE EDMR improves the sensitivity of EDMR in studies of semiconductor/oxide interface defects, an understanding of BAE in both electrical measurements and EDMR has not yet been investigated. In this work, we develop a BAE theory based on a modified Fitzgerald-Grove surface recombination methodology, which, in theory, may be utilized to fine tune conditions for EDMR measurements. BAE may also now be utilized as an analysis tool in purely "electronic" measurements. The model presented here may ultimately prove useful in development of resonance-based theories of BAE EDMR.
Citation
Journal of Applied Physics
Volume
130
Issue
13

Keywords

Surface recombination, defect density, MOSFETs

Citation

Ashton, J. , Moxim, S. , Purcell, A. , Lenahan, P. and Ryan, J. (2021), A quantitative model for the bipolar amplification effect: A new method to determine semiconductor/oxide interface state densities, Journal of Applied Physics, [online], https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0064397, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=932899 (Accessed December 7, 2021)
Created October 6, 2021, Updated October 7, 2021