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Progress in Developing Dietary Supplement Databases: Analytically Validated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) and Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) at NIH s Office of Dietary Supplements

Published

Author(s)

J T. Dwyer, Mary F. Picciano, J. M. Betz, Kenneth D. Fisher, L G. Saldanha, Elizabeth A. Yetley, Paul M. Coates, John A. Milner, Jackie Whitted, Vicki Burt, K Radimer, Jaimie Wilger, Katherine E. Sharpless, Joanne M. Holden, K W. Andrews, Janet M. Roseland, Cuiwei Zhao, Amy Schweitzer, J Harnly, W Wolf, C R. Perry

Abstract

Although an estimated 50% of US adults consume dietary supplements, analytically substantiated data on their bioactive constituents are sparse. Several programs funded by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health enhance dietary supplement database development and help to better describe the quantitative and qualitative contributions of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes. ODS, in collaboration with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), is developing an analytically substantiated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID). The products chosen initially for analytical verification are adult multivitamin-mineral supplements (often referred to as MVMs , multis or multiples ). The rationale is that these products are widely used, analytical methods are available for determining key constituents, and a certified reference material is in development. Also MVMs have no standard scientific, regulatory or marketplace definitions and have widely varying compositions, characteristics, and bioavailability; furthermore, bioequivalence of vitamins and minerals, and the extent to which actual amounts deviate from label values is not known. Ultimately the DSID will prove useful to professionals in permitting more accurate estimate of the contribution of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes of nutrients, and better evaluating the role of dietary supplements in promoting health and well-being. ODS is also collaborating with the National Center for Health Statistics to enhance the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dietary supplement label database for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (DSLD-NHANES). The newest ODS effort explores the feasibility and practicality of developing a database of all dietary supplement labels marketed in the United States (DSLD-USA). This article describes these and supporting projects.
Citation
Journal of Food Composition and Analysis
Volume
21

Keywords

dietary supplement, dietary supplement ingredient database, dietary supplement label database, multivitamin, Standard Reference Material

Citation

Dwyer, J. , Picciano, M. , Betz, J. , Fisher, K. , Saldanha, L. , Yetley, E. , Coates, P. , Milner, J. , Whitted, J. , Burt, V. , Radimer, K. , Wilger, J. , Sharpless, K. , Holden, J. , Andrews, K. , Roseland, J. , Zhao, C. , Schweitzer, A. , Harnly, J. , Wolf, W. and Perry, C. (2008), Progress in Developing Dietary Supplement Databases: Analytically Validated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) and Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) at NIH s Office of Dietary Supplements, Journal of Food Composition and Analysis (Accessed May 30, 2024)

Issues

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Created April 23, 2008, Updated October 12, 2021