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IMPACT OF VARIABLE ANTI-SWEAT HEATERS ON REFRIGERATOR FREEZER ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Published

Author(s)

David A. Yashar, Ki-Jung Park

Abstract

Anti-sweat heaters are often used to prevent condensation from forming on the outer surface of refrigerated cabinets. Variable anti-sweat heaters (VASH) represent a novel approach to saving energy through monitoring the environmental conditions surrounding a refrigerated cabinet and deploying anti-sweat heater only when it is needed. This study examines the energy consumption attributed to the variable anti-sweat heater technology of modern domestic refrigerators. The purpose of this research is to assist the US Department of Energy in their determination of the treatment of products using this technology. The study examined two French-door refrigerator-freezers with VASH and characterized the energy consumption of these units operating under three sets of conditions. The results of these tests were compared to energy consumption calculations based on the current waiver used to evaluate this technology. In both cases, the measured energy consumption was greater than the calculated energy consumption; however, the differences were small and the overall impact on the rated energy consumption was 0.7 % and 1.3 % for the tested units.
Citation
NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR) -

Keywords

refrigerator, variable anti-sweat heater, energy consumption

Citation

Yashar, D. and park, K. (2011), IMPACT OF VARIABLE ANTI-SWEAT HEATERS ON REFRIGERATOR FREEZER ENERGY CONSUMPTION, NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR), National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (Accessed December 3, 2023)
Created September 27, 2011, Updated February 19, 2017