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Electron-excited X-ray Microanalysis by Energy Dispersive Spectrometry at 50: Analytical Accuracy, Precision, Trace Sensitivity, and Quantitative Compositional Mapping

Published

Author(s)

Dale E. Newbury, Nicholas Ritchie

Abstract

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the introduction of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) with semiconductor detectors to electron-excited X-ray microanalysis. Initially useful for qualitative analysis, EDS has developed into a fully quantitative analytical tool that can match wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS) for accuracy in the determination of major (mass concentration C > 0.1) and minor (0.01 ≤ C ≤ 0.1) constituents even when severe peak interference occurs, and practical measurements can extend well into the trace (e.g., 0.0005 < C < 0.01) constituent range. Useful accuracy is possible for low atomic number elements (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, and F). By recording a full EDS spectrum at each picture element of a scan, comprehensive quantitative compositional mapping can be performed.
Citation
Microscopy and Microanalysis
Volume
25

Keywords

electron-excited X-ray microanalysis, elemental analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, quantitative analysis, scanning electron microscopy

Citation

Newbury, D. and Ritchie, N. (2019), Electron-excited X-ray Microanalysis by Energy Dispersive Spectrometry at 50: Analytical Accuracy, Precision, Trace Sensitivity, and Quantitative Compositional Mapping, Microscopy and Microanalysis, [online], https://doi.org/10.1017/S143192761901482X, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=927336 (Accessed April 15, 2024)
Created August 1, 2019, Updated March 8, 2023