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Density, Speed of Sound, and Viscosity Measurements of Alternative Aviation Turbine Fuels

Published

Author(s)

Tara J. Fortin, Stephanie L. Outcalt

Abstract

High fuel costs, the need to secure supply chains, and environmental concerns, have all led to an increasing interest in nonpetroleum sources such as natural gas, coal, and biomass, as potential alternatives to petroleum based aviation fuel feedstocks. Synthetic isoparaffinic kerosenes (S-IPK) are one such alternative. In this paper, we present density, speed of sound, and viscosity measurements for two S-IPK fuels. Measurements of density and speed of sound were carried out at ambient pressure (83 kPa) from 278 K to 343 K. A second instrument was also used to measure density of the compressed liquids from 270 K to 470 K with pressures up to 50 MPa. Viscosity measurements were carried out at ambient pressure from 263 K to 373 K. Data for all three properties are compared to data taken previously for another synthetic aviation fuel, S-8, and for two petroleum based Jet A fuels.
Proceedings Title
American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry
Conference Dates
March 27-31, 2011
Conference Location
Anaheim, CA
Conference Title
ACS Spring 2011 National Meeting & Exposition

Citation

Fortin, T. and Outcalt, S. (2011), Density, Speed of Sound, and Viscosity Measurements of Alternative Aviation Turbine Fuels, American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry, Anaheim, CA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=907278 (Accessed June 13, 2024)

Issues

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Created March 27, 2011, Updated February 19, 2017