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Automated Planning for Robotic Cleaning Using Multiple Setups and Oscillatory Tool Motions

Published

Author(s)

Ariyan M. Kabir, Krishnanand N. Kaipa, Jeremy Marvel, Satyandra K. Gupta

Abstract

This paper presents planning algorithms for robotic cleaning of stains on non-planar surfaces. Access to different portions of the stain may require frequent repositioning and reorienting of the object. Some portions with prominent stain may require multiple passes to remove the stain completely. Two robotic arms have been used in the experiments. The object is immobilized with one arm and the cleaning tool is manipulated with the other. The algorithm generates a sequence of reorientation and repositioning moves required to clean the part after analyzing the stain. The plan is generated by taking care of kinematic constraints of the robot. Our algorithm uses a depth- first branch-and-bound search to generate setup-plans. Cleaning trajectories are generated and optimal cleaning parameters are selected by the algorithm. We have validated our approach through numerical simulations and robotic cleaning experiments with two Kuka robots.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering
Volume
14
Issue
3

Keywords

Robotic cleaning, setup planning, cleaning by scrubbing, non-repetitive tasks

Citation

Kabir, A. , Kaipa, K. , Marvel, J. and Gupta, S. (2017), Automated Planning for Robotic Cleaning Using Multiple Setups and Oscillatory Tool Motions, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, [online], https://doi.org/10.1109/TASE.2017.2665460, https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=922314 (Accessed April 22, 2024)
Created July 30, 2017, Updated October 12, 2021