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Low-Phase Noise Frequency Synthesis

Summary

Design and implementation of low-phase noise oscillators and synthesizers

Description

Frequency synthesis plays an essential role in virtually all present-day commercial, industrial, and military technologies. State-of-the-art low-noise frequency synthesis is a crucial technical asset to high-resolution imaging and radar, high-speed telecommunications, and efficient management of the wireless spectrum. It is worth noting that the overall performance of various technologies depends on, and is often limited by, phase and amplitude fluctuation noise in oscillators and frequency synthesizers. A vital part of this group’s research focuses on the design of low-noise frequency synthesizers extending from RF to the tera-Hertz frequency range.

Major Accomplishments

The group designed a state-of-the-art RF synthesizer that generates the world’s lowest noise 5 MHz and 10 MHz signals. These signals were obtained by dividing an ultra-low phase noise optically-generated 8 GHz microwave signal by using state-of-the-art analog regenerative frequency dividers. (2013 IEEE UFFC-S Outstanding paper award)

 

5 MHz Graph of phase noise vs. offset frequency showing NIST synthesized signal, Wenzel OXCO, and BVA oscilloquartz.

 

10 MHz Graph of phase noise vs. offset frequency showing NIST synthesized signal, Wenzel OXCO, and BVA oscilloquartz.

NIST ultra-low phase noise RF signal at 5 MHz and 10 MHz compared to other leading technologies (see the pdf)

 
 
 
Created June 30, 2020, Updated July 8, 2020