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John H. Lehman (Fed)

Publications

Calibration of free-space and fiber-coupled single-photon detectors

Author(s)
Thomas Gerrits, Alan L. Migdall, Joshua C. Bienfang, John H. Lehman, Sae Woo Nam, Oliver T. Slattery, Jolene D. Splett, Igor Vayshenker, Chih-Ming Wang
We present our measurements of the detection efficiency of free-space and fiber-coupled single- photon detectors at wavelengths near 851 nm and 1533.6 nm. We

Patents

Non-Attenuating Meter for Determining Optical Energy of Laser Light

NIST Inventors
John H. Lehman, Matthew Spidell, Joshua Hadler and Paul A. Williams
Patent Description NIST has invented a device that permits full and accurate characterization of a laser beam without attenuating the laser beam or perturbing its direction. The unique three-mirror design allows the absolute power to be measured via radiation pressure (from the force on one mirror)
A metal cube (RPPM) mounted on a metal surface has round holes cut in each side.

Optical Power Meter

NIST Inventors
John H. Lehman and Paul A. Williams
NIST scientists have devised a radically new method of determining laser power by measuring the radiation pressure exerted by a laser beam on a reflective surface.
A disk-shaped device is smaller than the half-dollar coin underneath it.

Smart Mirror

NIST Inventors
Aly Artusio-Glimpse, John H. Lehman, Michelle Stephens, Nathan A Tomlin, Paul A. Williams and
This invention measures the power of a laser beam by detecting the displacement caused by photon pressure on a mirrored surface.
A flat pink device with a round black patch lies over a quarter.

Electrical-Substitution Radiometer

NIST Inventors
John H. Lehman and Nathan A Tomlin
This invention is an electrical-substitution radiometer (ESR) — a thermal detector for optical and infrared radiation — based on a novel configuration of arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.
Created July 30, 2019, Updated June 15, 2021