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Frederick Meisenkothen

Materials Research Engineer

Fred Meisenkothen is a Materials Research Engineer in the Materials Measurement Science Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Fred graduated from the University of Connecticut in 1994 with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. After graduation, Fred was employed as a machine design engineer at Gerber Technologies. He completed a post-graduate Manufacturing Technology / Machine Tool Program at Bristol T.E.C. in 1997.  Fred earned a M.S. in Materials Science (Metallurgy) from the University of Connecticut in 1998 and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Ohio State University in 2003. His graduate research was focused on phase transformations in TiAl-based alloys (Ph.D.), and modeling multi-phase, multi-component diffusion (M.S.).


Fred was employed, through UES, Inc., as a research scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Characterization Facility, WPAFB, OH for the eleven years prior to coming to NIST. As a staff scientist, he was one of three scientists responsible for the day-to-day scientific and technical operations in the facility. He functioned daily as a hands-on, jack-of-all-trades research scientist in microscopy and spectroscopy techniques on a full spectrum of materials that ranged in size from the macro-scale to the nano-scale.
      
Fred joined NIST in 2012, as a member of the Microscopy and Microanalysis Research Group. His research is predominantly focused on atom probe mass spectrometry. Specifically, Fred seeks to understand the key factors limiting accuracy in isotopic and chemical analyses performed with the atom probe. A recent topic of interest has been developing a machine-learning-based adaptive peak fitting algorithm to help make isotopic analyses in the atom probe accurate, repeatable, and mathematically defensible.

Awards

Material Measurement Laboratory, Service in Professional Organization Accolade, 2019.

Publications

Towards superconductivity in p-type delta-doped Si/Al/Si heterostructures

Author(s)
Aruna N. Ramanayaka, Hyun Soo Kim, Joseph A. Hagmann, Roy E. Murray, Ke Tang, Neil M. Zimmerman, Curt A. Richter, Joshua M. Pomeroy, Frederick Meisenkothen, Huairuo Zhang, Albert Davydov, Leonid A. Bendersky
In pursuit of superconductivity in p-type silicon (Si), we are using a single atomic layer of aluminum (Al) sandwiched between a Si substrate and a thin Si epi

Quantifying Atom-scale Dopant Movement and Electrical Activation in Si:P Monolayers

Author(s)
Xiqiao Wang, Joseph A. Hagmann, Pradeep N. Namboodiri, Jonathan E. Wyrick, Kai Li, Roy E. Murray, Frederick Meisenkothen, Alline F. Myers, Michael D. Stewart, Richard M. Silver
Doped semiconductor structures with ultra-sharp dopant confinement, minimal lattice defects, and high carrier concentrations are essential attributes in the
Created May 31, 2018, Updated June 30, 2020