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X-Ray Scattering and Imaging From Plastically Deformed Metals

Published

Author(s)

Gabrielle G. Long, Lyle E. Levine, Richard J. Fields

Abstract

New ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) facilities at 3rd generation synchrotron sources enjoy an additional 1 to 3 decades of X-ray brilliance over 2nd generation instruments, and can now quantify microstructural features from 3nm to 1.3 m in size. These developments offer exciting possibilities for further exploration of dislocation and other deformation microstructures. To the portfolio of existing techniques we now add a promising experimental window, USAXS imaging, in which high angular resolution images are acquired at scattering vectors related to the observed microstructures. Early results from this ultra-sensitive technique indicate that the arrangements of creep cavities in mildly deformed polycrystalline copper can be observed on many length scales, and the results can be compared with the size distributions derived directly from a USAXS analysis. Many of the features observed in USAXS imaging are not seen using other existing experimental techniques.
Citation
Materials Science and Engineering A-Structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing
Volume
309
Issue
Sp.

Keywords

dislocation structures, plastic deformation, ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering, USAXS imaging

Citation

Long, G. , Levine, L. and Fields, R. (2001), X-Ray Scattering and Imaging From Plastically Deformed Metals, Materials Science and Engineering A-Structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing (Accessed May 24, 2024)

Issues

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Created July 1, 2001, Updated February 19, 2017