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WATER TRANSPORT ACROSS A POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE UNDER THERMAL GRADIENTS

Published

Author(s)

David L. Jacobson, Richard Fu, Takeshi Shiomi, Ugur Pasaogullari, Joshua Preston, Shinichi Miyazaki, Yuichiro Tabuchi, Daniel S. Hussey

Abstract

A fundamental experimental and numerical study of the water transport across a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membrane under a temperature gradient is presented. The water transport phenomenon was experimentally investigated through water flux measurement and neutron radiography. The experimental observations found that water is transported in the direction from the high temperature side to the low temperature side, when both sides of the membrane are sufficiently humidified, and suggest the transport mechanism is concentration gradient driven. The neutron radiography measurements detected the presence of water content gradient across the membrane and higher water content is seen at a larger thermal gradient. A numerical model was developed to investigate the experimental results. Water transport predictions agreed qualitatively but more accurate material and transport property characterizations are needed for further improvement.
Citation
Journal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume
158

Keywords

PEFC, Neutron Radiography, Numerical Simulation, Water Transport

Citation

Jacobson, D. , Fu, R. , Shiomi, T. , Pasaogullari, U. , Preston, J. , Miyazaki, S. , Tabuchi, Y. and Hussey, D. (2011), WATER TRANSPORT ACROSS A POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE UNDER THERMAL GRADIENTS, Journal of the Electrochemical Society, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=907285 (Accessed April 23, 2024)
Created January 10, 2011, Updated October 12, 2021