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Universal Nature of Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids: A Comparative Study of Metallic and Polymeric Glass-Forming Liquids

Published

Author(s)

Jack F. Douglas, Hao Zhang, Xinyi Wang, Wensheng Xu

Abstract

Glass-formation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in which a common phenomenology is often observed in the temperature dependence of structural relaxation, and diffusion and in the functional form of relaxation functions describing the dynamics of this broad class of materials ranging from biological matter and synthetic polymeric materials to metallic materials and inorganic glass materials encountered in manufacturing. Despite the many regularities in the phenomenology of glass-formation, no general structural origin of local variations in the dynamic properties has been identified. Recent work on coarse-grained polymeric glass-forming liquids have shown the existence of mobile and immobile particles that are directly linked to diffusion and relaxation of these materials and the present work examines the extent to which this same type of clustering arises in the dynamics of metallic glass-forming liquids of vastly different structure and chemistry to assess the universality of dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids.
Citation
Journal of Chemical Physics

Keywords

polymer melt, metallic glass, dynamic heterogeneity, glass-formation, structural relaxation time

Citation

Douglas, J. , Zhang, H. , Wang, X. and Xu, W. (2019), Universal Nature of Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids: A Comparative Study of Metallic and Polymeric Glass-Forming Liquids, Journal of Chemical Physics (Accessed December 7, 2021)
Created November 14, 2019, Updated April 24, 2020