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Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering—X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy: A New Measurement Technique for in-situ Studies of Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Dynamics

Published

Author(s)

Fan Zhang, Andrew J. Allen, Lyle E. Levine, Jan Ilavsky, Gabrielle G. Long

Abstract

Ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering—X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (USAXS-XPCS) is a novel measurement technique for the study of equilibrium and slow nonequilibrium dynamics in disordered materials. This technique fills an existing gap between the accessible scattering vector ranges of dynamic light scattering and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. It also overcomes the limits of visible light scattering techniques imposed by multiple scattering and is suitable to study optically opaque materials containing near-micrometer sized structures. In this article we present an overview of the important technical aspects of USAXS-XPCS and offer a few examples as well as future outlooks to illustrate the capability of USAXS-XPCS for monitoring equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics.
Citation
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A-Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science
Volume
43A

Keywords

materials characterization, ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, equilibrium dynamics, nonequilibrium dynamics

Citation

Zhang, F. , Allen, A. , Levine, L. , Ilavsky, J. and Long, G. (2012), Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering—X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy: A New Measurement Technique for in-situ Studies of Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Dynamics, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A-Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=907783 (Accessed May 27, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created April 30, 2012, Updated October 12, 2021