Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Transport Behavior and Characterization of Precision 1 (OMEGA) Resistors for International Comparisons

Published

Author(s)

Randolph E. Elmquist, George R. Jones, Brian J. Pritchard

Abstract

The U. S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Measurement Institute of Australia (NMIA) have recently examined two types of precision transportable 1 (OMEGA) resistors that are based on different alloys and construction principles to determine characteristics that can increase the uncertainty of international comparisons. This work focuses on standards manufactured from 1970 through 2000 by the NML, and Thomas-type resistors designed in the 1930s by James L. Thomas and manufactured commercially through about 1980. The effects of temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, power loading, and heat dissipation in oil are described in these two types of transportable wire-wound 1 (OMEGA) resistance standards, and the process of characterization of these resistors for use as transport standards is described.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 8th International Seminar on Electrical Metrology
Conference Dates
June 17-19, 2009
Conference Location
Joao Pessoa
Conference Title
VIII Semetro

Keywords

electrical resistance standard, key comparison, temperature coefficient, power loading

Citation

Elmquist, R. , Jones, G. and Pritchard, B. (2009), Transport Behavior and Characterization of Precision 1 (OMEGA) Resistors for International Comparisons, Proceedings of the 8th International Seminar on Electrical Metrology, Joao Pessoa, -1, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=902545 (Accessed April 14, 2024)
Created June 1, 2009, Updated February 19, 2017