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Transmission Electron Microscopy Observations of Deformation and Fracture in Nanolaminated Cu-Ni Thin Films

Published

Author(s)

D E. Kramer, Timothy J. Foecke

Abstract

Deformation and fracture of nanolaminates have been investigated by in-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) straining of cross-sectioned epitaxial Cu/Ni nanolaminates grown on Cu (001) single-crystal substrates. Initial deformation is accommodated by confined layer slip. With continued straining, unstable fracture occurs creating a mixed-mode crack that propagates across the nanolaminate interfaces. Further straining results in stable crack growth with intense plastic deformation ahead of the crack tip over many bilayers in the direction of crack growth. However, the plastic zone is confined within a small distance normal to the crack. Post-mortem TEM, in general, did not reveal the presence of dislocation in the crack wake, except when the crack was deflected. By comparison, the plastic zone size in the substrate was greater by several of orders of magnitude.
Citation
Transmission Electron Microscopy Observations of Deformation and Fracture in Nanolaminated Cu-Ni Thin Films
Volume
82
Issue
No. 17-18

Keywords

fracture, metals, nanolaminates, TEM, thin films

Citation

Kramer, D. and Foecke, T. (2002), Transmission Electron Microscopy Observations of Deformation and Fracture in Nanolaminated Cu-Ni Thin Films, Transmission Electron Microscopy Observations of Deformation and Fracture in Nanolaminated Cu-Ni Thin Films (Accessed July 16, 2024)

Issues

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Created November 1, 2002, Updated February 17, 2017