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Theory and Simulation of Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering in s-p Bonded Systems: Graphite, Hexagonal Boron Nitride, Diamond, and Cubic Boron Nitride

Published

Author(s)

Eric L. Shirley

Abstract

This work discusses the theory of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the s-p bonded solids, graphite, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), diamond, and cubic boron nitride (cBN). In RIXS, core electrons are resonantly excited to unoccupied states, and x-ray emission (because of radiative core hole-valence electron recombination) is studied. In particular, evolution of the emission spectrum with increasing incident photon energy is of interest. This work begins with the independent-electron approach originally set forth by Ma and co-workers, which is based on the Kramers-Heisenberg formula for light scattering. However, the simulations also examine effects of the inclusion of the attraction between the promoted electron and core hole in intermediate states. The results suggest that, while RIXS emission spectra can be influenced by that attraction, many features of the indepent-electron picture are essentially preserved. The interplay between electron interactions, band-structure effects, and the effects being omitted are discussed.
Citation
Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena
Volume
110-111

Keywords

cubic boron nitride, diamond, graphite, hexagonal boron nitride, x-ray absorption, x-ray scattering

Citation

Shirley, E. (2000), Theory and Simulation of Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering in s-p Bonded Systems: Graphite, Hexagonal Boron Nitride, Diamond, and Cubic Boron Nitride, Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena (Accessed June 17, 2024)

Issues

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Created October 1, 2000, Updated February 17, 2017