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A technique to measure spin-dependent trapping events at the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor interface: Near zero field spin-dependent charge pumping

Published

Author(s)

Mark A. Anders, Patrick M. Lenahan, Nicholas J. Harmon, Michael E. Flatte

Abstract

We discuss a new technique to measure spin dependent trapping events at the MOSFET interface named near zero field spin dependent charge pumping (NZF SDCP) which is based on the powerful MOSFET interface trap characterization measurement called charge pumping. We find that the introduction of nitrogen and resolved hyperfine interactions can have a profound impact on the NZF SDCP response which suggests that NZF SDCP may be useful to get atomic scale information about MOSFET interfaces such as defect identification. We find that the NZF SDCP amplitude appears to saturate as a function of charge pumping frequency in most cases, but not all. We make model calculations which can explain this behavior. We also find that the NZF SDCP spectrum broadens with increasing charge pumping frequency. This may be an inherent NZF SDCP phenomena and may also allow for experimental exploration of some magnetoresistance theories regarding interaction times between charge carriers and traps.
Citation
Journal of Applied Physics
Volume
128
Issue
24

Citation

Anders, M. , Lenahan, P. , Harmon, N. and Flatte, M. (2020), A technique to measure spin-dependent trapping events at the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor interface: Near zero field spin-dependent charge pumping, Journal of Applied Physics, [online], https://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0027214 (Accessed March 4, 2024)
Created December 27, 2020, Updated March 1, 2021