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Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Metal-Organic Framework M2(2,5-dihydroxyterephthalate), M=( Mn, Co, Ni, Zn)

Published

Author(s)

Winnie K. Wong-Ng, James A. Kaduk, Hui Wu, Matthew Suchomel

Abstract

M2(dhtp)•nH2O, (M= Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; dhtp= 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalate), known as MOF74, is a family of excellent sorbent materials for CO2 that contains of coordinatively unsaturated metal sites and a honeycomb-like structure featuring a broad one-dimensional channel. This paper describes the structural feature and provides reference X-ray powder diffraction patterns of these four isostructural compounds. The structures were refined using synchrotron diffraction data obtained at beam line 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in Argonne National Laboratory. The samples were confirmed to be trigonal R (No. 148). From M= Mn, Co, Ni, to Zn, the lattice parameter a of MOF74 ranges from 26.17897(13) Å to 26.5737(2) Å, c from 6.65193(6) Å to 6.80899(10) Å, and V ranges from 3948.06 Å3 to 4164.02 Å3, respectively. The four reference X-ray powder diffraction patterns have been submitted for inclusion in the Powder Diffraction File (PDF).
Citation
Powder Diffraction
Volume
27
Issue
4

Keywords

Metal-Organic Framework, MOF74, CO2 capture materials, Reference powder X-ray patterns, Crystal structures

Citation

Wong-Ng, W. , Kaduk, J. , Wu, H. and Suchomel, M. (2012), Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Metal-Organic Framework M2(2,5-dihydroxyterephthalate), M=( Mn, Co, Ni, Zn), Powder Diffraction (Accessed June 21, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 28, 2012, Updated February 19, 2017