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A Surface Chemistry Study of Laser Ablated Plastics Used for Microfluidic Devices

Published

Author(s)

D P. Pugmire, E A. Waddell, Michael J. Tarlov

Abstract

Plastic substrates are being investigated for use in microfluidic devices because of their low cost, ease of fabrication, and wide range of materials properties. It is well established that the surface chemistry of a plastic substrate greatly influences the electroosmotic flow (EOF) behavior of microfluidic channels made from that material. Typical channel imprinting techniques do not offer direct control of surface chemistry. Laser ablation shows promise as a versatile method for directlyforming a variety of microchannel geometries in plastics. In addition, we have demonstrated that surface chemistry, and, therefore, EOF behavior can be controlled by changing the atmosphere under which laser ablation of the plastic is performed. The surfaces of several plastics ablated in a variety of environments were studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated totalreflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The results of this study will be presented and discussed.
Citation
A Surface Chemistry Study of Laser Ablated Plastics Used for Microfluidic Devices

Keywords

ATR-IR, infrared spectroscopy, laser ablation, microfluidic devices, plastic substrates, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS

Citation

Pugmire, D. , Waddell, E. and Tarlov, M. (2001), A Surface Chemistry Study of Laser Ablated Plastics Used for Microfluidic Devices, A Surface Chemistry Study of Laser Ablated Plastics Used for Microfluidic Devices (Accessed May 23, 2024)

Issues

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Created December 31, 2000, Updated October 12, 2021