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Studying the Response of Building Systems to Fire Using a Virtual Cybernetic Building Test-Bed

Published

Author(s)

William D. Davis

Abstract

As the ability to predict fire conditions in buildings using sensor signals improves, these predictions can be used to inform first responders about the building status and provide the possibility of using the building systems to contain the fire and aid in egress. While current fire models are used to predict the evolution of fire in buildings, the simulations do not include the interaction with actual building controllers. The NIST Virtual Cybernetic Building Test-Bed (VCBT) is designed to provide a method of coupling simulations of incidents such as fire to the response of actual building components such as HVAC controllers in multi-room, multi-floor buildings. This paper will give an overview of the VCBT and will provide descriptions of algorithms used to simulate heat, gas and smoke detectors. Methods for converting the sensor signals to provide information concerning fire conditions in buildings will be discussed.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the Fire Suppression and Detection Research Application Symposium
Conference Dates
January 21, 2003
Conference Title
Research and Practice: Bridging the Gap. Fire Suppression and Detection Research Application Symposium

Keywords

detector response, fire models, gas detectors, heat detectors, simulators, smoke detectors

Citation

Davis, W. (2003), Studying the Response of Building Systems to Fire Using a Virtual Cybernetic Building Test-Bed, Proceedings of the Fire Suppression and Detection Research Application Symposium, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=861214 (Accessed May 29, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created January 24, 2003, Updated February 17, 2017