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Stresses in Ion Exchange Layers of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

Published

Author(s)

Theo Fett, J -. Guin, Sheldon M. Wiederhorn

Abstract

This paper presents a new method to determine both the magnitude and the sign of the surface stresses that develop as a consequence of sodium/hydrogen ion exchange in soda-lime-silicate glass immersed in water. At 90 degrees C very thin layers that develop at the surfaces of polished glass specimens are found to have extremely high compressive stresses, -2.4 Gpa. The negative sign of the stress is consistent with earlier findings that the ion-exchange process involves hydronium ions (H3O+) and not bare protons (Hu+).
Citation
Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures
Volume
28
Issue
No. 6

Keywords

corrosion, fracture, fracture mechanics, glass, ion exchange

Citation

Fett, T. , Guin, J. and Wiederhorn, S. (2005), Stresses in Ion Exchange Layers of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass, Fatigue and Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures (Accessed April 13, 2024)
Created May 31, 2005, Updated October 12, 2021