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Strategies and Considerations for the Trace Detection of Fentalogs

Published

Author(s)

Edward R. Sisco

Abstract

Fentanyl and fentanyl analogs pose a significant and ever changing threat in the United States as both pure compounds and in complex mixtures. While commonly considered detection techniques require visible amounts of powder (i.e. color tests or GC/MS analysis), trace detection and identification methods present both a unique opportunity and a unique set of challenges. Rapid detection of non-visible residues containing fentanyl, or similar compounds, can be extremely useful in minimizing exposure of law enforcement at scenes, assessing public health implications, triaging evidence in forensic laboratories, and intelligence gathering. For trace detection to be successful the technique needs to be rapid, specific, capable of handling complex background matrices, and minimize the risk of exposure to the analyst. There also must be confidence that a detectable level of residue exists on the surface and remains present on the surface after exposure to the environment. This webinar will highlight two potential tools for the trace detection of fentanyl and NPS residues, thermal desorption direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (TD-DART-MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) while also providing context to the issues of expected residue contamination levels and environmental stability. Read more here.

Keywords

Forensics, Fentanyl, Opioids, Mass Spectrometry
Created October 26, 2017, Updated November 21, 2018