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Strain and Magnetic-Field Characterization of a Bronze-Route Nb3Sn ITER Wire: Benchmarking of Strain Measurement Facilities at NIST and University of Twente

Published

Author(s)

Najib Cheggour, Arend Nijhuis, H J. Krooshoop, Xifeng Lu, Jolene D. Splett, Theodore C. Stauffer, Loren F. Goodrich, Matthew C. Jewell, Arnaud Devred, Y Nabara

Abstract

A benchmarking experiment was conducted to compare strain measurement facilities at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Twente. The critical current of a bronze-route Nb3Sn wire, which was fabricated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), was measured as a function of axial strain and magnetic field in liquid helium at both institutes. NIST used a Walters’ spring strain device and University of Twente used a bending beam (“Pacman”) apparatus. The ITER bronze-route wire investigated had a very high irreversible strain limit that allowed comparing data over a wide range of applied strain between -1 % and +1 %. Similarities of the data obtained by use of the two apparatuses were remarkable, despite the many differences in their design and techniques.
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity
Volume
22
Issue
3

Keywords

Benchmarking, ITER, niobium-tin, strain

Citation

Cheggour, N. , Nijhuis, A. , Krooshoop, H. , Lu, X. , Splett, J. , Stauffer, T. , Goodrich, L. , Jewell, M. , Devred, A. and Nabara, Y. (2012), Strain and Magnetic-Field Characterization of a Bronze-Route Nb<sub>3</sub>Sn ITER Wire: Benchmarking of Strain Measurement Facilities at NIST and University of Twente, IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (Accessed August 1, 2021)
Created June 1, 2012, Updated February 19, 2017