Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

STEEL GRAVITY CONNECTIONS SUBJECTED TO LARGE ROTATIONS AND AXIAL LOADS

Published

Author(s)

Jonathan M. Weigand, Jeffrey W. Berman

Abstract

Steel gravity framing systems (SGFSs) rely on connections for system robustness when a column suffers damage that compromises its ability to carry gravity loads. Redistribution of gravity loads through the development of a sustained tensile configuration resulting from large vertical deflections is a key behavior in achieving robustness. Development of such an alternative load path depends on the ability of the gravity connections to remain intact after undergoing large rotation and axial extension demands. These demands are significantly larger than those considered for typical SGFS connection design. This paper presents the results of experiments on steel single-plate shear and bolted angle connections subjected to loading consistent with an interior column removal. The characteristic connection behaviors are described and the performance of multiple connection configurations are compared in terms of their peak resistances and deformation capacities.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the Eighth International Workshop on Connection in Steel Structures (Connections VIII)
Conference Dates
May 24-26, 2016
Conference Location
Boston, MA

Keywords

Connection, Single plate shear, Shear tab, Column removal, Disproportionate collapse

Citation

Weigand, J. and Berman, J. (2016), STEEL GRAVITY CONNECTIONS SUBJECTED TO LARGE ROTATIONS AND AXIAL LOADS, Proceedings of the Eighth International Workshop on Connection in Steel Structures (Connections VIII), Boston, MA, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=920903 (Accessed July 20, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created October 13, 2016, Updated June 13, 2017