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Spatially Resolved Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Single Layer Steps on Si (100) Surfaces: Experiment and Simulation

Published

Author(s)

Xiqiao Wang, Pradeep N. Namboodiri, Kai Li, Xiao Deng, Richard M. Silver

Abstract

A spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy study was carried out across single layer SA and SB step edges on Si (100) surfaces. The local density of states (LDOS) across SA step edges was found to be very similar to that observed on flat terraces. In contrast, the presence of rebonded SB step edges significantly modifies the local electronic properties. Metallic behavior was observed along the rebonded SB step edge. Self-consistent electrostatic calculations permit us to evaluate tip and edge state parameters by fitting the calculated band bending with the experimental observations. The charge states introduced by the rebonded SB step edge and its spatial influence under scanning tunneling conditions was quantified using a simplified surface state distribution model, which agrees well with a classical finite line of charge model at the rebonded SB step edge.
Citation
Physical Review B

Keywords

Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy, SA step, SB step, band bending, Si (100), in-situ characterization, atomic quantum device

Citation

Wang, X. , Namboodiri, P. , Li, K. , Deng, X. and Silver, R. (2016), Spatially Resolved Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Single Layer Steps on Si (100) Surfaces: Experiment and Simulation, Physical Review B, [online], https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.94.125306 (Accessed July 22, 2024)

Issues

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Created September 8, 2016, Updated November 10, 2018