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In-situ Adhesion Measurements Utilizing Layer-by-layer Functionalized Surfaces

Published

Author(s)

Adam J. Nolte, Jun Y. Chung, Marlon L. Walker, Christopher Stafford

Abstract

The adhesion between poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) hemispheres coated with layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyelectrolytes was investigated using Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. Measurements were performed against amine-functionalized glass slides both in air and aqueous solutions of controlled pH. Despite the increased density of negatively charged carboxylate groups, LbL-functionalized PDMS exhibited lower adhesion due to the combined effects of increased surface roughness and the high Young s modulus of the coating. Measurements of coated PDMS in aqueous solutions revealed tunable adhesion behavior dominated by pH-mediated changes in the mechanical properties of the coating. Smoothing the surface of the LbL coatings by aqueous salt annealing led to a significant increase in adhesion. Our results suggest that LbL assembly can be an effective means of surface functionalization for in-situ adhesion measurements, but understanding and predicting the adhesion behavior requires comprehensive knowledge of the chemical, mechanical, and topological changes of the coating in response to the solution environment.
Citation
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume
1
Issue
2

Keywords

adhesion, layer-by-layer, polyelectrolytes, polymer, JKR, PDMS, roughness

Citation

Nolte, A. , Chung, J. , Walker, M. and Stafford, C. (2009), In-situ Adhesion Measurements Utilizing Layer-by-layer Functionalized Surfaces, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=854429 (Accessed July 20, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created January 6, 2009, Updated October 12, 2021