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Publications

Search Publications by

Long Phan (Fed)

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Displaying 26 - 47 of 47

Pore Pressure in High-Strength Concrete at High Temperature

August 1, 2005
Author(s)
Long T. Phan
This paper presents results of an experimental program to study the effects of elevated temperature exposure on pore pressure buildup and potential for explosive spalling in normal strength (NSC) and high-strength concrete (HSC). Thermally-induced pore

Response to Fire Exposure of the Pentagon Structural Elements

August 1, 2005
Author(s)
Paul K. Mlakar, D O. Dusenberry, J R. Harris, G A. Haynes, Long Phan, M A. Sozen
An overview of fire damage sustained by the Pentagon structural elements in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack is provided. The fire intensity in some compartments of the affected areas inside the Pentagon was approximated to be between those of the

September 11, 2001, Airliner Crash Into the Pentagon

August 1, 2005
Author(s)
Paul K. Mlakar, D O. Dusenberry, J R. Harris, G A. Haynes, Long Phan, M A. Sozen
The Pentagon was constructed between September 1941 and January 1943. A substantial renovation of the entire 6.6 million sq ft (610 thousand sq m) facility began in 1999 and is scheduled for completion in 2010. On September 11, 2001, a hijacked commercial

The Pentagon Building Performance Report

January 1, 2003
Author(s)
P E. Mlakar, D O. Dusenberry, J R. Harris, G A. Haynes, Long Phan, M A. Sozen
Following the September 11 crash at the Pentagon of an airliner commandeered by terorists, the American Society of Civil Engineering established a building performance study team to examine the damaged structure and make recommendations for the future. The

High-Strength Concrete at High Temperature - An Overview

June 1, 2002
Author(s)
Long T. Phan
This paper presents results of NIST's experimental program on the effects of elevated temperature exposure on the mechanical properties and potential for explosive spalling of high strength concrete (HSC). Mechanical properties of HSC were measured by

Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Concrete at Elevated Temperatures

March 1, 2001
Author(s)
Long T. Phan, Nicholas J. Carino
This report describes results of NIST's experimental program that focuses on effects of elevated temperature exposure on mechanical properties of hing strength concrete (HSC). Mechanical properties were measured by heating, with and without preload, the

Fire Performance of High Strength Concrete: Research Needs

May 1, 2000
Author(s)
Long T. Phan, Nicholas J. Carino
A compilation of fire test data which shows distinct behaviroal differences between HSC and NSC at elevated temperature is presented. The differences are most pronounced in the temperature range of 20 {degrees}C to 400 {degrees}C. What is more important is

Post-Installed Anchors. A Literature Review

January 1, 1998
Author(s)
Geraldine S. Cheok, Long T. Phan
A literature review of studies on the behavior of post-installed concrete anchors is presented. The survey covers several types of anchors that are subjected to tension loads, shear loads, and to combined shear and tension loads. Brief summaries of the

Review of Mechanical Properties of HSC at Elevated Temperature

January 1, 1998
Author(s)
Long T. Phan, Nicholas J. Carino
A compilation of experimental results on the mechanical properties of concrete when exposed to rapid heating as in a fire are presented. Emphasis is placed on concretes with high original compressive strengths. That is, high-strength concretes (HSCs). The