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Role of salt on adhesion of an epoxy/aluminium (oxide) interface in aqueous environments

Published

Author(s)

Christopher C. White, Kar T. Tan, Donald L. Hunston, Justin M. Gorham, Aaron M. Forster, Vogt D. Bryan

Abstract

The durability of adhesive joints in hostile environments is a major area of concern in structural adhesive bonding. Therefore, understanding the mechanics and mechanisms of degradation of adhesive joints is a key factor for more extensive use in future engineering applications. In this contribution, we aim to develop a more complete understanding of failure mechanisms of an epoxy/aluminium oxide interface upon exposure to liquid water and aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl). A fracture mechanics approach based on a shaft-loaded blister test was employed to measure adhesive fracture energy of the joints. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), neutron reflectivity (NR), water sorption and contact angle measurements were used to elucidate mechanisms of adhesion loss.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society
Volume
35
Conference Dates
February 23-26, 2014
Conference Location
San Diego, CA
Conference Title
2014 Adhesion Society Meeting

Keywords

Adhesion, salt, neutron reflectivity, XPS, mechanical properties, polymers, epoxy, aluminum

Citation

White, C. , Tan, K. , Hunston, D. , Gorham, J. , Forster, A. and Bryan, V. (2014), Role of salt on adhesion of an epoxy/aluminium (oxide) interface in aqueous environments, Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society , San Diego, CA (Accessed June 19, 2024)

Issues

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Created February 16, 2014, Updated February 19, 2017