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Role of microstructure and composition in resisting hydrogen embrittlement of fastener grade steels

Published

Author(s)

Nicholas Nanninga, Jack Grochowski, Lloyd Heldt, Karl Rundman

Abstract

The degree of hydrogen embrittlement for several fastener grade steels has been determined. The technique used to assess the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of the steels was the rising step load test on notched tensile specimens. While microstructural alteration resulted in some improvement in resistance to hydrogen embrittlement, the overriding factor contributing to susceptibility of the steel was strength. The susceptibilities of the microstructures to hydrogen embrittlement, ranked in decreasing order, are as follows: tempered martensite, bainite, fine pearlite. The effect of alloying was also assessed by comparing rising step load results from different fastener grade steels with similar microstructures. In most cases, the alloy chemistry had little effect on rising step load results, presumably due to trap saturation associated with this testing technique.
Citation
Corrosion Science
Volume
52

Keywords

steel, microstructure, hydrogen embrittlement, bainite, pearlite, tempered martensite07

Citation

Nanninga, N. , Grochowski, J. , Heldt, L. and Rundman, K. (2009), Role of microstructure and composition in resisting hydrogen embrittlement of fastener grade steels, Corrosion Science (Accessed April 18, 2024)
Created July 13, 2009, Updated February 19, 2017