Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Roadmap on Emerging Hardware and Technology for Machine Learning: Section 12 - Superconducting Hardware for Neuromorphic Computing

Published

Author(s)

Jeff Shainline, Segall Kenneth

Abstract

Recent progress in artificial intelligence is largely attributed to the rapid development of machine learning, especially in the algorithm and neural network models. However, it is the performance of the hardware, in particular the energy efficiency of a computing system that sets the fundamental limit of the capability of machine learning. Data-centric computing requires a revolution in hardware systems, since traditional digital computers based on transistors and the von Neumann architecture were not purposely designed for neuromorphic computing. A hardware platform based on emerging devices and new architecture is the hope for future computing with dramatically improved throughput and energy efficiency. Building such a system, nevertheless, faces a number of challenges, ranging from materials selection, device optimization, circuits fabrication, and system integration, to name a few. The aim of this Roadmap is to present a snapshot of emerging hardware technologies that are potentially beneficial for machine learning, providing the Nanotechnology readers with a perspective of challenges and opportunities in this burgeoning field.
Citation
Nanotechnology

Keywords

neuromorphic computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, superconducting electronics

Citation

Shainline, J. and Kenneth, S. (2020), Roadmap on Emerging Hardware and Technology for Machine Learning: Section 12 - Superconducting Hardware for Neuromorphic Computing, Nanotechnology (Accessed June 15, 2024)

Issues

If you have any questions about this publication or are having problems accessing it, please contact reflib@nist.gov.

Created October 19, 2020, Updated October 13, 2022