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Residual PM Noise Evaluation of Radio Frequency Mixers

Published

Author(s)

Corey A. Barnes, Archita Hati, Craig W. Nelson, David A. Howe

Abstract

Direct observation of phase modulated (PM) noise is often difficult due to the high dynamic range that exists between the carrier and the modulated sidebands. A common tool used to reduce the dynamic range is the phase detector, which removes the carrier and down-converts its noise sidebands to baseband. The double balanced mixer (DBM) is the most widely used phase detector for high resolution PM noise detection at most carrier frequencies. For Fourier offset frequencies close to the carrier, the residual flicker phase noise of the DBM is often the limiting factor of a PM noise measurement system. Careful evaluation of the phase detector under various operating conditions can lead to the optimization of a PM noise measurement system’s sensitivity. This paper describes a survey of residual PM noise measurements for a variety of DBMs at 5 MHz. In order to attain quality measurements, careful attention is devoted to the reduction of ground loops during PM noise measurements. The input powers to the local oscillator (LO) and reference frequency (RF) ports of the mixers are varied to determine the optimal operating point of these devices.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum
Conference Dates
May 1-5, 2011
Conference Location
San Francisco, CA

Keywords

Flicker noise, mixers, phase detector, phase noise

Citation

Barnes, C. , Hati, A. , Nelson, C. and Howe, D. (2011), Residual PM Noise Evaluation of Radio Frequency Mixers, Proceedings of the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, San Francisco, CA (Accessed July 17, 2024)

Issues

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Created July 31, 2011, Updated February 19, 2017