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Repeatability of Energy Consumption Test Results for Compact Refrigerators

Published

Author(s)

David A. Yashar

Abstract

Recently, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been interested in examining the current procedure that is used to measure the energy consumption of compact refrigerators (ANSI/AHAM HRF-1). As part of the DOE's Appliance Standards Program, NIST performed round-robin tests of three compact refrigerators using their facilities in Gaithersburg, MD, and three independent laboratories that perform these tests.Upon examination of the results of the round robin tests, it was clear that there are a few major issues, which cause significant differences in the measured energy consumption from laboratory to laboratory. After the completion of the round robin tests, the compact refrigerators used in this study underwent extensive testing at NIST to further examine the effects of the noted problems with the procedure.This paper reports the results of the round robin tests, and the results of the extensive testing at NIST. This paper also suggests possible changes to the testing procedure that would reduce problems with the repeatability of the test results.
Citation
NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR) - 6560
Report Number
6560

Keywords

AHAM HRF-1, compact refrigerator, compact refrigerator energy consumption, refrigerator

Citation

Yashar, D. (2000), Repeatability of Energy Consumption Test Results for Compact Refrigerators, NIST Interagency/Internal Report (NISTIR), National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, [online], https://doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.6560 (Accessed April 13, 2024)
Created September 1, 2000, Updated November 10, 2018