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Regenerative Stablity Analysis of Highly Interrupted Machining

Published

Author(s)

Matthew A. Davies, Jon R. Pratt, Brian S. Dutterer, Timothy J. Burns

Abstract

We discuss theoretical and experimental work that supports the use of very low radia immersion in the high-speed milling of difficult-to-machine materials, such as titanium alloys. Our theory is based upon modeling the cutting process by a kicked harmonic oscillator with delay. Traditional regenerative chatter theory predicts that, for a single degree of freedom system, the most stable speeds are at integral multiples of the natural frequency of the system. The new theory predicts a set of stable speeds at fractions of the damped natural frequency. For small damping, a subset of these stable speeds is approximately the same as predicted by the traditional theory. From a practical point of view, the most important prediction of our new theory is that the number of optimally stable speeds doubles as the ratio p of time per revolution of tool contact with the material to the spindle period becomes small, i.e., p
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Metal cutting & High Speed Machining
Volume
1
Conference Dates
June 27-29, 2001
Conference Location
Metz, FR
Conference Title
3rd International Conference on Metal cutting & High Speed Machining

Keywords

high speed machining, interrupted cutting, stability lobes, tool chatter

Citation

Davies, M. , Pratt, J. , Dutterer, B. and Burns, T. (2001), Regenerative Stablity Analysis of Highly Interrupted Machining, Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Metal cutting & High Speed Machining, Metz, FR (Accessed June 25, 2024)

Issues

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Created January 1, 2001, Updated February 19, 2017