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RECON -- A Controlled English for Business Rules

Published

Author(s)

Fabian M. Neuhaus, Edward J. Barkmeyer Jr.

Abstract

Capturing business rules in a formal logic representation supports the enterprise in two important ways: it enables the evaluation of logs and audit records for conformance to, or violation of, the rules; and it enables the conforming automation of some enterprise activities. The problem is that formal logic representations of the rules are very difficult for an industry expert to read and even more difficult to write, and translating the natural language of the enterprise to formal logic is an unsolved problem. RECON Restricted English for Constructing Ontologies is a subset of English that can be easily read by an industry expert, while having a formal grammar and an unambiguous translation to formal logic. This paper describes the principal features of the RE- CON language, with examples, and shows the corresponding formal logic constructs that are produced by the RECON tool.
Proceedings Title
RuleML 2013 The 7th International Web Rule Symposium: Special Track on "Translating between Human Language and Formal Rules: Business, Law, and Government"
Conference Dates
July 11-13, 2013
Conference Location
Seattle, WA, US

Keywords

controlled English, business rules, formal logic

Citation

Neuhaus, F. and Barkmeyer Jr., E. (2013), RECON -- A Controlled English for Business Rules, RuleML 2013 The 7th International Web Rule Symposium: Special Track on "Translating between Human Language and Formal Rules: Business, Law, and Government" , Seattle, WA, US, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=913703 (Accessed May 30, 2024)

Issues

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Created July 12, 2013, Updated October 12, 2021