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Recent Progress in Nanoscale Indentation of Polymers Using the AFM

Published

Author(s)

Mark R. VanLandingham, John S. Villarrubia, G F. Meyers

Abstract

Regardless of the type of test, reliable indentation measurements require knowledge of the shape of the indenter tip. For indentation measurements involving sub-micrometer scale contacts, accurate knowledge of the tip shape can be difficult to achieve. In this paper, a technique referred to as blind reconstruction is applied to the measurement of tip shapes of indenters used in conjunction with the atomic force microscope (AFM) to indent polymeric materials. This method offers the potential for material independent calibration of indenter tips with high spatial resolution. Initial results from blind reconstruction are compared to results of an indentation tip shape calibration method, in which a reference material of known modulus is indented using a range of applied loads. Discrepancies between the two sets of results are discussed in terms of experimental uncertainties.
Proceedings Title
Proceedings of the SEM IX International Congress on Experimental Mechanics
Conference Dates
June 5-8, 2000
Conference Location
Undefined
Conference Title
Society for Biomaterials Meeting

Keywords

atomic force microscopy, blind reconstruction, depth-sensing indenter, nanoindentation

Citation

VanLandingham, M. , Villarrubia, J. and Meyers, G. (2000), Recent Progress in Nanoscale Indentation of Polymers Using the AFM, Proceedings of the SEM IX International Congress on Experimental Mechanics, Undefined, [online], https://tsapps.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=860274 (Accessed February 23, 2024)
Created May 31, 2000, Updated October 12, 2021