Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Quantitative Measurement of Resolution as a Function of Defocus in Different Microscopy Modalities Using a Simplified Technique

Published

Author(s)

Aric W. Sanders, Alexandra Curtin, Ryan Skinner

Abstract

The distance over which the resolution of a microscope image changes appreciably, related to the depth of field, is an important parameter. This value determines the height of an object that can be imaged and said to be “in focus”. Although this distance is important in microscopy, it is typically quoted from calculations based on simplified assumptions (such as perfect optics) or presented qualitatively. In order to measure the effects of defocussing in different microscopies, we use the logistic equation to determine image resolution from light-to-dark edge transitions. The characteristic distance over which the light-to-dark transition occurs has been related to the resolution of a spatially calibrated scanning transmission electron image of the Si lattice. An example of an image analyzed by this method is presented in Figure 1. Images like this provide many different light-to-dark transitions that provide a robust measurement of resolution. Here we use this definition of resolution to measure resolution at different values of defocus in different types of microscopy.
Proceedings Title
Microscopy and Microanyalsis
Volume
21
Conference Dates
August 2-6, 2015
Conference Location
Portland, OR

Keywords

microscopy, resolution, nanoscience

Citation

Sanders, A. , Curtin, A. and , R. (2015), Quantitative Measurement of Resolution as a Function of Defocus in Different Microscopy Modalities Using a Simplified Technique, Microscopy and Microanyalsis, Portland, OR, [online], https://doi.org/10.1017/S1431927615009332 (Accessed January 26, 2022)
Created September 23, 2015, Updated June 2, 2021