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Prototype Tests of a Miniature Radiation Pressure Sensor

Published

Author(s)

Alexandra B. Artusio-Glimpse, Paul A. Williams, Nathan A. Tomlin, Ivan Ryger, Michelle S. Stephens, John H. Lehman

Abstract

Using reflection, radiation pressure (RP) sensors provide a means for in-situ power measurement simply and accurately. The first realization of multi-kW RP power meters (RPPM) established a new paradigm of optical power measurement technology [1]. Our objective is to advance this technology and bring about smaller, faster, and more sensitive devices. Earliest testing of a miniature prototype silicon spring integrated with a capacitive bridge displacement sensor that promises to improve measurement sensitivity and speed is presented. We show a reduction in thermal strain of the device by adding a strain balancing metal coating and demonstrate the open loop response of the detector to laser pulses from 100 ms to 2 s duration.
Proceedings Title
Proceeding of NEWRAD 2017, 13th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in
Optical Radiometry
Conference Dates
June 13-16, 2017
Conference Location
Tokyo
Conference Title
NEWRAD 2017, 13th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in
Optical Radiometry

Keywords

radiation pressure, laser radiometer, power meter, RPPM, micromechanical, spring, archimedean spiral, thermal strain

Citation

Artusio-Glimpse, A. , Williams, P. , Tomlin, N. , Ryger, I. , Stephens, M. and Lehman, J. (2017), Prototype Tests of a Miniature Radiation Pressure Sensor, Proceeding of NEWRAD 2017, 13th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry, Tokyo, -1 (Accessed February 24, 2024)
Created July 1, 2017, Updated July 2, 2020